SITE OBSERVATION 6_WATER ACCESSIBILITY OBSERVING_DELIVERABLES

Site Observation 6

Site Observation 6

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SITE OBSERVATION 0.006_Water Accessibility Observing

The site has an advantage of being a buffer between the river and the city. Generally, when as qualified civic space, it plays a role of extension from city and its communities. Therefore, site specific, it is an extension to the river.

Being close to the water will no doubt be both an attraction and benefit about this intended civic ( Remember that the site was included in the “Waterfront Plan” proposed by Hargreaves Associates). One of my design goal is that no matter where a person stands on the site, i want that person feels he is connected to the water in a way.

When I look at the site map, the water features mainly conclude the mississippi river next to site and two major lakes ( big ponds) on site. And I am sure that there exist some other water features on site that are either not big enough to be visible on the site map or already polluted as what I observed from last site observation.

Compare to other three concentrations, my understanding would be, civic is the one that can have the least connection to the existing site conditions. In another word, if needed, we can change the site to the extent that mostly fit our programmatic needs more than other three could be able to achieve.

But, although i believe in what was stated above, my design intention is to keep the existing conditions as much as possible. So, this site observation is set up on a base or assumption that the designed site, especially in the aspects of  water features and topography, will keep the same as much as what it is now.

Being close to water, can be reached both in a visual and physical way. I divided the site into several subareas that has different water-status shown on the site map( have or don’t have obvious water features, have different water features, etc). Then I will experience in each subarea to see if there is a feel of being close to the water and no matter if there is, what needs to be suggested improving or changing ( especially in the aspects of water features and topography)

The deliverables are going to be  several site images having some analysis on them, it will be digital.

Subareas


That’s it

I cooled down after yesterday’s review, and I think what Brad really meant is that if my rendering is irrelevant to the design and took too much time, then I should stop it. I am going too far apart on a track to the wrong side of proper design.

I had some skills from my former jobs, but I need to learn new things from school and focus on the design, that is why I am here.

I am not showing off anything. Honestly it is not what I don’t want to, everybody, if there is a chance, wants to show something that else can’t reach. It is just  I don’t even think Brad would be amazed by what all the class have presented so far because I know what level I am at right now and what he have experienced and seen. I think there is a stupid competition going on within some people in the class. I have no right to evaluate anyone, for myself, I am just a beginner, so don’t try to be smart if you are not, cuz what you really got is always recognized by the real wise people at that level.

I need to put my feet down and go back to work.

SITE OBSERVATION 5

Artboard

Artboard

Graphic Design intention:

1. The whole format was created based on the concept of ” windows” to show each piece of site scenes in a feeling that people see     through windows.

2. Using framework and measurement to give a relatively accurate sense of the perspective.

3. Using mainly black, white and red to organize the color scale of the image.

4. Some simple 3d shape and back ground light rendering trying to give a feeling of modernism.

5. Index lines refers to the real height of the objects relatively

Referring to the three questions on the assignment sheet, my understanding would be:

1. I believe that macro-scale temporal changes are accumulation of periodically micro-scale gradients that cannot be easily observed. Each single piece of movement together will lead to the possible macro-scale temporal changes and determine the property of the changes. It is the same structural hierarchy as the atomy forms everything that the property of the atom decides what different objects would be .

2. As my understanding of the world, everything is actually change. More specifically to the site, light, smell, wind, creatures, no matter physical or biological context, they are changing all the time. The observing interval is just a manner that how often you look at them, how often you face them, the intervals that individuals decide to observe the site will definitely have an impact on the changing frequency, scale and extent that they consider the site would have.

3. I believe that micro or macro temporal changes are important in the understanding of site. The temporal changes, although phenomenal, are outer presentation of what are embedded in the site, in another word, they directly or indirectly reveal some essences of the site. More importantly, as what I stated for the first question, they are going to determine how the site will be in a dynamic perspective.

Just not being dumb again

I didn’t see it as simply bad or good. Although it was obviously not good.

I really thought and still consider that our concept is somehow, no offense to some other groups, more profuse and structured. It is just our representation skills were not capable of exhibiting it all out and another undeniable flaw was that we never found an appropriate way to express our ideas. plus, we were indeed short of key diagrams that can well break down the concept in a graphic way.

Generally speaking, the representation was ok except for my  master plan which was a total bust standing out awkwardly that caused this ugly disharmony to the rest of the drawings. To be honest, after more than five years of “photoshop a plan” working experience now suddenly I felt that I actually don’t know jack about how to render a plan, man that is pathetic.

” A nice rendering is not how cool it is, it expresses your design ideas; it is not about you should use green for trees or blue for water, but if you use red for water, use it in all drawings.” Brad’s words best pointed out why my plan was no doubt a piece of crap. Plus that, shading, labeling, the basic rule of a rendering that provides required spacial and literature explanation, has been totally forgotten, I don’t know how this happened, for every piece of my former rendering I was required and I used to label it before handle it to the client. God knows what I was thinking. Or I wasn’t even thinking, that’s right, I was just running like a computer but without enough memories.

Former rendering sample

FORMER WORK SAMPLE _Maybe not a style, but definitely personal preference

Anyway. For future, I need to speed up and be more efficient so that I can have time to refine each drawing and  finish all of them on time to support my presentation.

I am totally on the side of being competitive within the studio members but I don’t wanna use “kick some butts” as motivation. Maybe it is a lie to everyone since everybody thinks about it all the time, but to learn how to design and each single step of a site design process firmly should be the goal of this studio that we focus on.

Material Research_Woods

A. Basics

Although there are thousands of species of trees, most structural wood used in the United States comes from a few dozen species that are selected from commercial processing.

The two groups of woods used for building purposes are the softwoods and hardwoods:

1. The wood from conifers (e.g. pine), such as pine and spruce, is called softwood.

2. The wood from dicotyledons (usually broad-leaved trees, e.g. oak and maple) is called hardwood.

Softwoods are indeed mostly softer than hardwoods, but there are situations when the definitions are a bit misleading, as hardwoods are not necessarily hard, and softwoods are not necessarily soft. The well-known balsa (a hardwood) is actually softerthan any commercial softwood. Conversely, some softwoods (e.g. yew) are harder than many hardwoods.

Wood to be used for construction work is commonly known as lumber in North America,  which refers to wood in any of its stagesfrom felling to readiness for use as structural material for construction. (In the United States and Canada, timber often refers to the wood contents of standing, live trees that can be used for lumber or fiber production, although it can also be used to describe sawn lumber whose smallest dimension is not less than 5 inches.)

Different stages of lumber 1

Different stages of lumber 2

B. Types

1 Pines

Pines are among the most commercially important of tree species, valued for their timber and wood pulp throughout the world. In temperate and tropical regions, they are fast-growing softwoods that will grow in relatively dense stands, their acidic decaying needles inhibiting the sprouting of competing hardwoods. Commercial pines are grown in plantations for timber that is denser, more resinous, and therefore more durable than spruce (Picea).

Pine wood is widely used in high-value carpentry items such as furniture, window frames, panelling, floors and roofing, and the resin of some species is an important source of turpentine.Because pines have no insect or decay resistant qualities after logging, they are generally recommended for construction purposes as indoor use only (ex. indoor drywall framing).

Pine

Lumber surface

2. Cedar

Some species from the real Cedar genus are used for furniture and storage chamber materials.

Ceder

Ceder

Lumber surface

Lumber surface

Cedar also applied to a number of woods from trees in the Cypress family mainly in North America, such as Red Cedar, Whitecedar and YellowCedar in Softwoods, and to woods from some relatives of the mahogany, like Australian Red Cedar in Hardwoods.

a. Western or Pacific Red Cedar

Its soft red-brown timber has a tight, straight grain and few knots. Its highly natural resistance to decay, being extensively used for outdoor construction in the form of posts, decking, shingles and siding. It is commonly used for the framing and longwood in lightweight sail boats and kayaks.

Pacific Red Cedar

Pacific Red Cedar

Lumber surface

Lumber surface

b. Northern White Cedar

Northern White Cedar is commercially used for rustic fencing and posts, lumber, poles, shingles and in the construction of log cabins,White cedar is the preferred wood for the structural elements, such as ribs and planking, of birchbark canoes and the planking of wooden canoes.

Northern White Cedar

Northern White Cedar

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

c. Atlantic White Cypress or Atlantic White Cedar

The wood is reported to endure moisture indefinitely; it has been used for fence-posts, ties and shingles.

Atlantic White Cypress

Atlantic White Cypress

Lumber Surface

d. Yellow Cedar

The various physical properties of the wood make it an attractive material for both general construction and boat building. Due to its slow growth it is hard and, like other cypress woods it is durable; it therefore offers good dimensional stability, and is resistant to weather, insects, and contact with soil. It works easily with hand or machine tools; it turns and carves quite well. It can be fastened with glues, screws, and nails. Nootka Cypress’s texture, uniform color, and straight grain will take a fine finish. It resists splintering and wears smoothly over time.

Due to its expense, it is used mainly for finished carpentry. Typical uses include exterior siding, shingles, decking, exposed beams, glue-laminated beams, paneling, cabinetry, and millwork.

Yellow Cedar

Yellow Cedar

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

e. Australian Red Cedar

It was used extensively for furniture, wood panelling and construction, including shipbuilding.

Australian Red Cedar

Australian Red Cedar

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

3. Fir

The wood of most firs is considered unsuitable for general timber use, and is often used as pulp or for the manufacture of plywood and rough timber. Because this genus has no insect or decay resistance qualities after logging, it is generally recommended for construction purposes as indoor use only (e.g. indoor drywall framing). This wood left outside cannot be expected to last more than 12 to 18 months, depending on the type of climate it is exposed to.

Fir

Fir

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

4. Teak

Teak is the common name for the tropical hardwood tree species Tectona grandis and its wood products

Teak is used extensively in India to make doors and window frames, furniture, and columns and beams in old type houses. It is very resistant to termite attacks. It is also used widely in boat decks, as it is extremely durable and requires very little maintenance.

Teak

Teak

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

5. Ipe (Tabebuia)

Tabebuia is a neotropical genus of about 100 species

Species in this genus are important as timber trees. The wood is used for furniture, decking, and other outdoor uses. It is increasingly popular as a decking material due to its insect resistance and durability.

Much of the ipê imported into the United States is used for decking.

Ipe

Ipe

Lumber Surface

Lumber Surface

C. Modules

The principle of modular construction systems is that standardised single components are put together to build a complete system.

The benefits of Modules construction are:

economic construction  with similar series

low development costs and quicker product cycles

simple assembly and repair processes

variations due to the combination of several components.

For wood construction, the modular system refers to pre-cut dimensional lumbers, which is a term used for lumber that is finished/planed and cut to standardized width and depth specified in inches.

Dimensional lumbers

Dimensional lumbers

North American softwood dimensional lumber sizes
Nominal (in) Actual Nominal (in) Actual Nominal (in) Actual
1 × 2 34 in × 1 12 in (19 mm × 38 mm) 2 × 2 12 in × 1 12 in (38 mm × 38 mm) 4 × 4 12 in × 3 12 in (89 mm × 89 mm)
1 × 3 34 in × 2 12 in (19 mm × 64 mm) 2 × 3 12 in × 2 12 in (38 mm × 64 mm) 4 × 6 12 in × 5 12 in (89 mm × 140 mm)
1 × 4 34 in × 3 12 in (19 mm × 89 mm) 2 × 4 12 in × 3 12 in (38 mm × 89 mm) 6 × 6 12 in × 5 12 in (140 mm × 140 mm)
1 × 6 34 in × 5 12 in (19 mm × 140 mm) 2 × 6 12 in × 5 12 in (38 mm × 140 mm) 8 × 8 14 in × 7 14 in (184 mm × 184 mm)
1 × 8 34 in × 7 14 in (19 mm × 184 mm) 2 × 8 12 in × 7 14 in (38 mm × 184 mm)
1 × 10 34 in × 9 14 in (19 mm × 235 mm) 2 × 10 12 in × 9 14 in (38 mm × 235 mm)
1 × 12 34 in × 11 14 in (19 mm × 286 mm) 2 × 12 12 in × 11 14 in (38 mm × 286 mm)
Hardwood dimensional lumber sizes
Nominal Surfaced 1 Side (S1S) Surfaced 2 sides (S2S)
12 in 38 in (9.5 mm) 516 in (7.9 mm)
58 in 12 in (13 mm) 716 in (11 mm)
34 in 58 in (16 mm) 916 in (14 mm)
1 in or 44 in 78 in (22 mm) 1316 in (21 mm)
14 in or 54 in 118 in (29 mm) 1116 in (27 mm)
12 in or 64 in 138 in (35 mm) 1516 in (33 mm)
2 in or 84 in 11316 in (46 mm) 134 inches (44 mm)
3 in or 124 in 21316 in (71 mm) 234 in (70 mm)
4 in or 164 in 31316 in (97 mm) 334 in (95 mm)

In North America, sizes for dimensional lumber made from hardwoods varies from the sizes for softwoods. Boards are usually supplied in random widths and lengths of a specified thickness, and sold by the board-foot (144 cubic inches or 2,360 cubic centimetres, 112th of 1 cubic foot or 0.028 cubic metros)

 

D. Finishes & Treatment

Wood finishing refers to the process of embellishing and/or protecting the surface of a wooden material.

Wood treatment refers to protecting wood from damage caused by insects, moisture, and decay fungi.

For full technical details please see the following links

 

E. AutoCAD plan for material application